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Mentzer / yates heavy duty training method.


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Oh boy, that brings back some good memories. Pseudonym, Mike Mentzer was one of the icons of the bodybuilding world some years back. He believed in very intensive training but advocated only 1 one, or two sets maximum per exercise. He also encouraged folks to train that particular exercise once a week only. Modern bodybuilders for instance might pyramid a set, or do ascending sets with maybe a set or two in the end of the exercise (to get that pump). Dorian Yates and Mentzer completely went the opposite route and trained one set per exercise. But that one set very intense set! They believed in total rest of that body part for a week or more before exercising that body part. It obviously worked for that as both were world class bodybuilders.

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you got it bheeman.

in fact yates was of relatively small stature before he started lifting weights, and after he ended his competitive days he lost a lot of size.

mentzer was rock hard and practised the super intense low rep/set style of training all the way through his career.

yates won 6 olympias and used variations of this method right the way through his olympia reign.

any chance of a loan of that book pimp.. 8)

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  • 5 weeks later...

Hey diamond. We've trained this method together so I can now vouch for the fact it gets a real good pump in relative quick time.

Training intensity is not always just quantity. It can be heavy, it can be minimal rest it all depends on the person and the day. As long as you train honest bra.

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Hey diamond. We've trained this method together so I can now vouch for the fact it gets a real good pump in relative quick time.

Training intensity is not always just quantity. It can be heavy, it can be minimal rest it all depends on the person and the day. As long as you train honest bra.

hey my friend good to see you posting . yeah that session in hammy was a good blast . was sore for few days afterwards. have been using this method of training now for the last 2 months and have put on more muscle than i did in the 6months previous .

see you saturday.

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  • 1 month later...

i went to the new zealand college of fitness and high intensity training is the same method we were taught to teach clients. they called it abbreviated strength training though. i did a research assignment on single versus multiple set training at uni and most university studies show no significant difference between training with one set versus more. all my clients get stronger every single time they train. i won't say it is the best way to train because every training program will give results. the theory behind HIT is that you train, rest, adapt and then train again but you will be able to lift more reps or weight. the other school of thought is that you train hard and frequently and build up fatigue, and your true fitness level is masked by that fatigue. im going to experiment on myself to see which is better. recording my progress on my blog.

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i went to the new zealand college of fitness and high intensity training is the same method we were taught to teach clients. they called it abbreviated strength training though. i did a research assignment on single versus multiple set training at uni and most university studies show no significant difference between training with one set versus more. all my clients get stronger every single time they train. i won't say it is the best way to train because every training program will give results. the theory behind HIT is that you train, rest, adapt and then train again but you will be able to lift more reps or weight. the other school of thought is that you train hard and frequently and build up fatigue, and your true fitness level is masked by that fatigue. im going to experiment on myself to see which is better. recording my progress on my blog.

Sounds interesting.. whats the link to your blog?

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interesting....if you watch Dorian Yates "Blood and Guts" you will see he does in fact do more than one set per exercise (with quite significant weights) - granted he eventually does an all out high intensity set BUT how many sets can we call warmup sets when they all seem to increase in weight and decrease in reps and hence thats how he gets his training volume.....doesnt look anything special to me. 'One set' thats got to be a myth :?

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those are all warm-up sets. for example if you are benching or rowing or doing pulldowns with 205 x 5 a good warm-up would be something like:

Bar x 12

85 x 6

115 x 5

145 x 3

165 x 1

185 x 1

205 x 5 workset

the first 6 sets are all warm-ups and they are not of the ''volume'' type neither are you putting in your maximum effort. the final set, or your true workset is where you put an all out effort.

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those are all warm-up sets. for example if you are benching or rowing or doing pulldowns with 205 x 5 a good warm-up would be something like:

Bar x 12

85 x 6

115 x 5

145 x 3

165 x 1

185 x 1

205 x 5 workset

the first 6 sets are all warm-ups and they are not of the ''volume'' type neither are you putting in your maximum effort. the final set, or your true workset is where you put an all out effort.

Would you do this type of warmup for all your lifts or just the bigger/compound type only? And would you have rest intervals between each warmup set? I'm thinking of doing something similar, but it seems like it'll make the overall workout drag for ages... :?

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those are all warm-up sets. for example if you are benching or rowing or doing pulldowns with 205 x 5 a good warm-up would be something like:

Bar x 12

85 x 6

115 x 5

145 x 3

165 x 1

185 x 1

205 x 5 workset

the first 6 sets are all warm-ups and they are not of the ''volume'' type neither are you putting in your maximum effort. the final set, or your true workset is where you put an all out effort.

Would you do this type of warmup for all your lifts or just the bigger/compound type only? And would you have rest intervals between each warmup set? I'm thinking of doing something similar, but it seems like it'll make the overall workout drag for ages... :?

that would depend on what sequence the lifts are done in. Doing barbell curls after your heavy back work may require one set or in some cases for some trainees, none at all. While barbell squats done as the first exercise of the day will require a thorough warm-up of all the musculature involved.

so for example if you're doing a 90 lb barbell curl or lying tricep extension after heavy back work one set with 65 lbs or so is all you need. if however you are doing them after heavy back work or benching it might be something like:

35 x 10

55 x 5

75 x 3

90 x 10

about the rest intervals and too much time-wasting, lets take an example of a warm-up for a 425lbs squat or bench press (taken from Dave Tate):

45 x 5 x 2

95 x 3 x 2

135 x 3

185 x 3

225 x 3

275 x 1

315 x 1

365 x 1

425 x 1

If you rest 1.5 minutes in between those 10 warm-up sets thats a total of 15 minutes.

if you're benching 315 it would look like:

45 x 5 x 2

95 x 3 x 2

135 x 3

185 x 3

225 x 3

275 x 1

315 x 1

here you will only need 12 minutes for a warm-up.

basically the heavier the weight you use the more warm-ups you will need. so if you're lifting 'men's health'weights (not directed at you) you probably need only one set. If you're deadlifting say 400 or 500lbs 2 or 3 warm-up sets won't cut it.

you can also use the same basic format for a 150 x 8 bench, row, or pull-down:

45 x 5 x 2

95 x 3

115 x 2

135 x 1

150 x 8

my point is that what deepsouth was talking about ''when they all seem to increase in weight and decrease in reps'' is in fact not volume training but the optimal way to warm-up for both BBs and powerlifters. you start-out with lower weights, higher repetition sets, and then as the weight climbs the repetitions decrease, usually to singles or doubles before the work sets even if they are repetition sets.

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i'l be posting my results at joelbell.blogspot.com

i went on the university of canterbury sports medicine database and there are a lot of studies in favour of single set training.

im not going to go out there and say it is the best. do what you enjoy in the time you have and make the weights go up!

in reading arnolds encyclopedia of bodybuilding he advocates a few warm up sets too, before going on to do 14-20 sets for a body part.

heres some links to studies in favour of single set training:

http://www.acsm-msse.org/pt/re/msse/abs ... 29!8091!-1

http://cbass.com/NEWEVIDE.HTM

http://www.mikementzer.com/moreisbet.html

http://physiotherapy.curtin.edu.au/reso ... rength.cfm

you may need to be a member to view this one:

http://bjsm.bmj.com/cgi/content/abstract/36/5/319

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that would depend on what sequence the lifts are done in. Doing barbell curls after your heavy back work may require one set or in some cases for some trainees, none at all. While barbell squats done as the first exercise of the day will require a thorough warm-up of all the musculature involved.

so for example if you're doing a 90 lb barbell curl or lying tricep extension after heavy back work one set with 65 lbs or so is all you need. if however you are doing them after heavy back work or benching it might be something like:

35 x 10

55 x 5

75 x 3

90 x 10

about the rest intervals and too much time-wasting, lets take an example of a warm-up for a 425lbs squat or bench press (taken from Dave Tate):

45 x 5 x 2

95 x 3 x 2

135 x 3

185 x 3

225 x 3

275 x 1

315 x 1

365 x 1

425 x 1

If you rest 1.5 minutes in between those 10 warm-up sets thats a total of 15 minutes.

if you're benching 315 it would look like:

45 x 5 x 2

95 x 3 x 2

135 x 3

185 x 3

225 x 3

275 x 1

315 x 1

here you will only need 12 minutes for a warm-up.

basically the heavier the weight you use the more warm-ups you will need. so if you're lifting 'men's health'weights (not directed at you) you probably need only one set. If you're deadlifting say 400 or 500lbs 2 or 3 warm-up sets won't cut it.

you can also use the same basic format for a 150 x 8 bench, row, or pull-down:

45 x 5 x 2

95 x 3

115 x 2

135 x 1

150 x 8

my point is that what deepsouth was talking about ''when they all seem to increase in weight and decrease in reps'' is in fact not volume training but the optimal way to warm-up for both BBs and powerlifters. you start-out with lower weights, higher repetition sets, and then as the weight climbs the repetitions decrease, usually to singles or doubles before the work sets even if they are repetition sets.

Nice explanation! This info's timely 'cos an oldtimer at the gym who seems to know what he's talking about suggested trying a warmup like the one you explained but he said to incorporate in there 1 heavier single prior to the working sets headscratch.gif

So whats the difference between warming up this way vs getting on the bike for 5mins, doing a couple of stretches, then getting out some 10 or so reps of squats with just the bar before progressively loading the weight on for your working sets? Is the former better for the CNS? Or something to do with force production? I have no idea :oops:

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So whats the difference between warming up this way vs getting on the bike for 5mins, doing a couple of stretches, then getting out some 10 or so reps of squats with just the bar before progressively loading the weight on for your working sets? Is the former better for the CNS? Or something to do with force production? I have no idea :oops:

warming up the body as a whole unit is important before lifting weights. this is where the bike or treadmill can come in handy.doing a light five to 10 minute overall body warm up on the bike or five to 10 minutes on the treadmill or just a brisk walk is quite important.

when you do the warming-up with the weights in the way I mentioned- and esp. if you use those one rep warm-ups as suggested to you- it primes the CNS to fire. if you don't do proper warm-ups your workset will feel heavier. also you can actually hit a new PR during the session if you do a proper warm-up.

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