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2007 NZFBB event category changes


MasterTel

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The NZFBB had their first Executive meeting for 2007 last Sunday. It was also the annual judges meeting.

Some motions passed of interest to competitors are some new and amended classes, plus changes to the qualification for some age-restricted classes.

Classic Mens Class - this new class will be introduced in 2007. One combined class per regional event and up to three classes at Nationals. The qualification is as follows:

up to and including 170cm: max weight (in kg) = height (cm) - 100 + 2kg

up to and including 178cm: max weight (in kg) = height (cm) - 100 + 4kg

over 178cm: max weight (in kg) = height (cm) - 100 + 6kg

Therefore a competitor who is 168cm tall can be up to 70kg, at 175cm the max weight is 79kg and at 182cm the max is 88kg. This is similar to NABBA's Athletic class qualification which is height (cm) - 100 + 2 for all competitors.

Women's Physique: replace the existing 3 classes (up to 52kg, 52-57kg, over 57kg) for both Novice and Open competitors with 2 new ones: Up to and including 55kg and Over 55kg.

Masters Men: these classes revert back to how they were before 2006 i.e. Over 40 (one class) and Over 50. The Under 80kg / Over 80kg split of the Over 40 class plus the Over 60 class have been removed.

Note that in some classes, the qualification for Nationals will apply to the top 5 placed competitors instead of the usual 3.

A proposal was also passed to amend the age criteria for Junior and Master athletes such that:

a. An athlete, male or female, may compete as a JUNIOR competitor up to and including December 31st of the year in which the athlete reaches his or her 21st birthday.

b. A female athlete may compete as a MASTER competitor from January 1st of the year in which the athlete reaches her 35th birthday.

c. A male athlete may compete as a MASTER competitor from January 1st of the year in which the athlete reaches his 40th birthday (in the case of the category 40-49 years of age), 50th birthday (in the case of the category 50-59 years of age), or 60th birthday (in the case of the category 60 years of age and older).

This means that a Junior who turns 21 in February can still compete as a Junior until Dec 31 that year. Also, a male competitor who turns 40 in December can compete as a Masters competitor any time that year, even though they are still only 39.

Full details will be posted on the NZFBB website in the next few weeks.

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Thanks MasterTel. So the general effect will be to create fewer, larger classes in the Women's Physique, and Masters Men? Interesting...

Now, the formula you've given for the Classic class is

up to and including 170cm: max weight (in kg) - 100 + 2kg

Should that be

up to and including 170cm: max weight (in kg) = height (cm) - 100 + 2kg
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Thanks, Pseudonym - well spotted! I've amended my original post to include the "= height (cm)" to the equations.

Yes, Andrew - your question is correct. We are using the official IFBB equations which means the taller competitors (over 178cm) can be up to 4kg heavier than they would if doing the Athletic Class in NABBA.

It's not ideal to have just one regional Classic class, but it was decided to trial one class for now, see how it goes and then re-evaluate it for next year. One thing we were wary of is having too many classes overall, hence the reduction of some classes in Women's physique and Masters Men. As always it depends on how many people compete at an event - some shows have only one or two (if any) in a class while other classes can have 10+. Allowing the top 5 to qualify for Nationals will help compensate for classes that will now have more competitors esp. Women's physique.

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  • 3 weeks later...

There is only one Classic class per event, Ed. Because it is a new class for the NZFBB, we will have to wait and see how popular it is before adding extra classes.

Like any regional event, you never know until registration how many you will get in a class, or what the quality will be like - especially in Novice classes. It is even harder to guess how many we will get in the Classic class on April 21.

I know a number of 40+ year old male competitors who will wait until they register before they decide whether they will compete in Masters or do their Novice/Open weight class. And in NABBA events, these competitors also have a choice between Physique and Athletic. Last year I competed in Masters Athletic, but I could have done Novice Athletic, Masters Physique or Novice Physique instead if I chose to. Sometimes having a choice can be a curse.

Perhaps talk to Phil K and see what he suggests. One suggestion I have is don't stress about which class you might place higher in - there is too much guess work involved. Whichever class you do, just aim to be the best you can rather than worrying about where you will place.

I hope this helps a bit.

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Thanks for that - I agree fully

I really am not too worried about placing it isn't about that for me... (but I do want to be competitive)

It is just that I didn't think I would be able to qualify for the New Class

but seems I would make it easy.

I am just happy to give my best and see what happens.

Will see what Phil says and then see what happens on the day : )

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Good luck with your deliberations on category, and FYI I am thinking of going to Wellington to see you and others compete - knowing how much work you have put into your prep. Awesome going.

I haven't done heaps of comps, but when I first competed I had a choice between novice and an age category. I didn't know what to do. I ended up selecting a novice category as I thought it would be a good bench marking process for me as a newbie to the sport. As it happened if I had selected the age group, which was smaller in size, I would have automatically placed higher. The novice field in my particular year had at least 10 competitors. It was scarey for a first time. But the experience was great - and placing in that large field has always meant more to me than the higher trophy I could have won if I had competed in the age group. I subsequently went on in later comps to compete in an age category. I figured you only get to be a novice in the early comps - but the age categories will always be there - being old doesn't change ! :D

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Hi M.T, in your Wellington Show what class in the mens classic are you having as you can see below there are 3 class. In the masters they had U/80kg and O/80kg last year did this not work out for the NZFBB

HOG

Classic Mens Class - this new class will be introduced in 2007. One combined class per regional event and up to three classes at Nationals. The qualification is as follows:

up to and including 170cm: max weight (in kg) = height (cm) - 100 + 2kg

up to and including 178cm: max weight (in kg) = height (cm) - 100 + 4kg

over 178cm: max weight (in kg) = height (cm) - 100 + 6kg

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That's 100% correct, Ed - there will be just one combined Classic class at each regional event, with the qualification based on whichever of the three height/weight ratios the competitor fits into. The easy way to look at it - if your weight satisfies the qualification based on your height, you qualify to compete in this new class, along with anyone else who qualifies and chooses to compete in the Classic class.

The ratio is a bit more complicated than that used for NABBA's Athletic class, which is the same ratio regardless of height (i.e. height (cm) - 100 + 2kg is the max weight allowed).

Keep in mind that this is a new class, and if the numbers justify adding more classes, then this will be given serious consideration for future events. Then, assuming the class gets established, in future years we can introduce Novice and Open splits (and maybe Masters Classic), but at the moment everyone will be a "Novice" in this class.

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hi mastertel, i heard from a comitee member that nzfbb are getting rid of the drug testing as they want to incourage more big guys to compete again and also so some atheltes can become pro?

Just wondering why they would do this as this is the only good thing for this sport. Also why keep it on the down low and not tell anyone, unitll a year later atheletes start wondering where the testers have gone?

is this a funding thing or what is the true story??

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Hi 02flex - I'm happy to fill you (and anyone else on this site) in on the actual situation so you have a clearer picture of the situation.

At our NZFBB Executive meeting held a couple of weeks ago, various issues regarding drug testing were discussed and debated. Several points were noted that raised a concern that retaining drug testing was perhaps doing us (as an organisation) and our members more harm than good, namely:

1. We haven't received any funding or financial assistance from SPARC or the government for at least the past two years

2. Significant reductions to certain permissable level limits, like the Testosterone/EpiTestostone ratio, are opening up a number of competitors to potential failed tests when there natural levels are above this new limit.

3. The random nature of the testing, and only small numbers of people selected for tests, meaning that some competitors are able to avoid failing a test by beating the odds. Drug Free NZ dictate who and how many people get tested, as they pay for each (expensive!) test.

4. The abundance of rumours on who is not using and who is, plus what people are using. I'm sure a lot of people are fed up with this, and you don't (from my experience) get this happening nearly as much (if at all) with NABBA competitors and events.

Based on these and other comments, I suggested as a motion, which was passed, that we approach our members with a detailed document containing as much relevant info about the drug testing, and ask them if they prefer to keep the testing or remove it. Then, based on that feedback we could then possibly consider a motion to remove the testing.

So, there is certainly no intention at this stage to remove the testing - merely to find out what our members feel and go from there. Obviously there are plenty of pros and cons both ways. As well as this being just a consideration (rather than a determined effort to remove the testing), it was only considered a few weeks ago and certainly not something we have kept quiet for some time.

I hope this answers your concerns - I'd welcome anyone elses input on this topic as it is always a contentious issue and the more feedback we get the more informed we can all be.

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Hi there mastertel.

Thanks so much for your imput, I think the federation is very lucky to have you as a represtentive! I would sugest to keep it a natural drug tested federation, but in saying that, I know allot of guys hanging to become pro and this is an obsticale for them (i would never wnat this, but i must admit i admire anyone that wants to follow that dream). in saying this, I think the Federation should combine a show/ class with there nationals only for a pro status (the winner of this can apply). this sepperate class would not be tested!!!!! your normal nationals would still be tested as per usuall.... this would solve everything and everyone would be more open to the sport and would stop this dragging the chain of whats everyone up to. what do you think???

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Thanks very much for those comments, 02flex - much appreciated.

Having a separate non-tested class/event is a great idea in theory, but not so easy in practice. This idea was also floated at the meeting, but apparently it is not possible to have a non-tested class at a tested event i.e. either all competitors are eligible for testing or none of them are.

Having a separate event that isn't tested is probably more feasible, but from the feedback at the meeting, this also is not at all easy to do given the current setup. Sorry I don't have specific reasons why, but there are a lot of "grey" areas with the testing.

These suggestions are all very useful to add to the consideration of what we can and can't do. Hopefully with some more research into the possibilities plus feedback from our members (there are over 400 current NZFBB members) we can then work something out to suit most people.

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I suggested as a motion, which was passed, that we approach our members with a detailed document containing as much relevant info about the drug testing, and ask them if they prefer to keep the testing or remove it. Then, based on that feedback we could then possibly consider a motion to remove the testing.

I wonder if it would be worth giving the same survey to members of the general public as well? If public perception is important to us (and I don't know whether it is or not) I suspect removing drug testing is not going to be looked upon favourably by the public and the media...

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I suggested as a motion, which was passed, that we approach our members with a detailed document containing as much relevant info about the drug testing, and ask them if they prefer to keep the testing or remove it. Then, based on that feedback we could then possibly consider a motion to remove the testing.

I wonder if it would be worth giving the same survey to members of the general public as well? If public perception is important to us (and I don't know whether it is or not) I suspect removing drug testing is not going to be looked upon favourably by the public and the media...

the public and the media will always have that problem.

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The media wouldn't give a stuff. Now if it was Rugby that decided to drop drug testing, then that would be big news!

We must all remember that the general public, looks at bodybuilding as a drug addled sport!

Consider the following:

1)The freakish nature of some bodybuilders like Ronnie

2)TV docos like the'Man with the exploding arms' Greg Valentino and that one on the British Woman

3)High profile media cases on Justin Rys and the debacle over Moe's testing a couple of years ago

Kinda paints a bad picture for the sport as a whole.

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I would be kind of disappointed. From a newbies point of view - I would not be interested in getting into the sport if I knew that to get anywhere and be competitive I would have to use drugs. I run a youth group and one of the guys is thinking of doing the Taranaki Comp later in the year... Getting him hooked into a sport that peer pressured into performance drugs? No way! I know "clean" makes it harder for big gains but it also really makes the gains mean more.

This from someone who knows very little about the sport and culture of bodybuilding, but is excited to be getting into it and looking forward to wellington.

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The media wouldn't give a stuff. Now if it was Rugby that decided to drop drug testing, then that would be big news!

We must all remember that the general public, looks at bodybuilding as a drug addled sport!

Consider the following:

1)The freakish nature of some bodybuilders like Ronnie

2)TV docos like the'Man with the exploding arms' Greg Valentino and that one on the British Woman

3)High profile media cases on Justin Rys and the debacle over Moe's testing a couple of years ago

Kinda paints a bad picture for the sport as a whole.

although I'm not a fan of the science experiment look-a-like figures of today's pros I don't think the public or the media appreciates nor understands the effort, dedication etc... that one has to put to become pro let alone win an olympyia. bodybuilding is not just injecting some stuff in yourself.

as for greg valentino he's a complete retard to say the least.

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I would be kind of disappointed. From a newbies point of view - I would not be interested in getting into the sport if I knew that to get anywhere and be competitive I would have to use drugs. I run a youth group and one of the guys is thinking of doing the Taranaki Comp later in the year... Getting him hooked into a sport that peer pressured into performance drugs? No way! I know "clean" makes it harder for big gains but it also really makes the gains mean more.

This from someone who knows very little about the sport and culture of bodybuilding, but is excited to be getting into it and looking forward to wellington.

I see nothing wrong with it. a person shouldn't be downgraded because of his use of steriods.

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Just wanted to clarify something I read on this site and on the Gofigure regarding this topic, it seems to be the opinion of some contributors that the road to Pro status is paved with steroids, and if these are not allowed back into NZFBB then noone will be granted their Pro card.

To qualify for Pro status you simply have to be in good standing with your federation, in the early ninties a very competitve Canadian Pro called Andre Bilideou secured his card through submitting his application to the head of the Pro division at that time Wayne De Millia along with some photos to prove his competitiveness, without having won his national championship.

I can confirm that in discussions with our President I have been granted permission to apply for my pro card in the near future if I choose to take that path, and I have been informed that another competitor who won their incredibly competitive class at the 2006 nationals has also been granted Pro status. This infomration was given to me first hand by the very athlete so is true and accurate, not rumour, and I expect them to give some people a severe fright in 2009 :shock: .

The path to pro status in NZ is achieved by a)winning a national title, b) not failing the drug test after and c) applying for it. there are several who fufill the first two categories and if they applied would easily be granted- (Joe Ulberg for example).

Please don't let the Pro card desire cloud the issue at hand, the drug testing policy and the federation are their for the entire membership not the few elite, or those who dream of IFBB pro staus while competing for another federation. It may come after discussion that removing the testing is for the better, as a financial decision it makes no sense as Spark are not coming to the party with money, and it was of no consequence to the Lion foundation that NZFBB had testing and NABBA didn't when they sponsored the 2005 NABBA nationals, that was a financial decision on their behalf as I understand it.

Happy training,

Michael Kingsnorth

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I gather the main point MasterTel is trying to get across here is that the main reason for even talking about this was because the levels for a positive test have been dropped. I think this has been forgotten again as everyone whips up a storm about nattys getting up on stage next to some monsters....still makes for great reading though.

Hey, if you've got the option to turn pro do it. It's a natural progression for those at the top of their game (no pun intended) to want to take it to the next level. If it were my goal, then I'd be as happy as a pig in shit to have IFBB Pro after my name. It's the same concept as an NPC rugby player getting selected for the All Blacks.

I have a couple of questions for you Mike, didn't Joe Ulberg refuse a drug test a few years back, thus stripping him of his title? Surely this would render him ineligible? Also, Justin Rys didn't exactly follow the road you set outn here, how did he get his?

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Firstly to the Joe Question: HELL NO!!!! I was actually Joes representative in the drug testing room at the 2003 Nationals to ensure everything was all above board and I can assure you I watched EVERYTHING and he passed (no pun) as required, I was also in the room 2 weeks prior getting tested myself in Wellington (after he beat me) when he was also tested for winning the overall. So no the man himself has never refused as I remember.

It certainly would be phenominal to have IFBB PRO after my name, and I'm about 95% certain it is going to happen, I just have to decide whether to do the Worlds this year, the Australasian Elite next year or bypass both and go straight to the pros.

Justin, as I understand it earned his card through having won the 1999 Nationals, and his refusal if I am correctly informed was an out of season test well AFTER the show, of which he served a 2 year suspension.

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