BuffaloBalls

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About BuffaloBalls

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    Junior member

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  • Gender
    Male
  • Steroid use
    Enhanced
  • Training type
    Gym Junkie

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  1. cheers mate.. Melatonin come in safe and sound. But as I had to go to the doc I got a script for melatonin anway so was covered.. Script is for 3mg tabs. So 3mg is legal in NZ....
  2. Thanks Dianabol.. Have you ever used them before? Are they realiable?
  3. Now this looks great.. .. Im tempted to try to get this in, but dont like the idea of throwing away $40 if it gets stopped. GABA and Melatonin are both prescription only in NZ unfortunately.. Hmmmm.. http://www.anabolicoutlaws.com/product_details.html?productcode=sand&resultpage=product_list_page_wfilters.html&ocateckey=anabolicoutlawsall
  4. Some good reading here, and all free. http://www.anasci.org/ebooks/
  5. Dissapointed. Went to order some other stuff from iherb and they dont sell it. Where would one order Armodafinil from?
  6. All good, i have bought the 1mg tabs for starters.. It'll give me room to play with the doseage. will try 1mg for a week if useless bump up to 2, then up to 3 to see where it works best. Once I know that, I know what to oder for the next time.. And if I do have to order the 3mg and they catch it, I expect the worse they'll do is to send me a warning. So not the end of the world. Just be a pain losing it.
  7. I have ordered it, and yets its you need a script for it in NZ.. Should I ask iherb to be discreet with the packaging? Or are they on to it? If it goes get stopped by medsafe/ customs I'll just go to my doctor and get a prescription to show customs.. Problem solved. Problem with getting it prescribed here in NZ is its not funded, so apparently quite expensive. Just makes sense to buy online.
  8. Handy info cheers guys.. I was going to buy some melatonin online and couldnt figure out where to buy from. iherb looks to have some really great prices.. Anyone had experience with this product from iherb? Seems too cheap. Is it the real thing? https://nz.iherb.com/pr/Natrol-Melatonin-3-mg-240-Tablets/4299
  9. Lol, now Im really worried.. Think I'll pack my bags and head for the air port tonight.. Hmm, how to smuggle all my millions of dollars out with me? Might stash it all in my undies.. Shhhh, dont tell the cops..
  10. no worries.. Whats the name of your pharmacy so I can google earth it. Then I can send the cash to the address on the pharmacies website..
  11. There are many legit pharamcies selling online. just a matter of figuring out which ones.. And I have an idea. Look for address on website. Then use google earth street view to check to see if a pharmacy actually exists at that address.. Next step to google which country can legitmately sell meds to the public. Im a bloody genius lol
  12. just found this little beauty.. But not sure if thats world wide or only the states.. " "3. Look for "dot pharmacy" in the address. If an online pharmacy has ".pharmacy" at the end of its web address, it's OK to buy medicine there. Only outfits that follow the law can use that domain." http://www.webmd.com/healthy-aging/features/beyond-the-pharmacy-online-and-mail-order-prescription-drugs
  13. Im after some PCT gear, and am going to try to buy through a legit source. I.E a legal over seas pharmacy. But there are many sites. How to tell which are true chemists ie real pharmacies and which are just u.g sites with a nice website... I dont want to buy U.G, for pc if I can avoid it.. Anyone know how im going to about determining which online site is a legit chemist? And yes, I do realise there is a chance it will get stopped at customs. Im quite willing to take that risk.. I assume first step would be finding which countries can legally sell what im after with out a prescription and target a pharmacy from that country? Does anyone know which countries are legally allowed to sell meds Im after?
  14. " TIAdverse events associated with testosterone administration.AUBasaria S, Coviello AD, Travison TG, Storer TW, Farwell WR, Jette AM, Eder R, Tennstedt S, Ulloor J, Zhang A, Choong K, Lakshman KM, Mazer NA, Miciek R, Krasnoff J, Elmi A, Knapp PE, Brooks B, Appleman E, Aggarwal S, Bhasin G, Hede-Brierley L, Bhatia A, Collins L, LeBrasseur N, Fiore LD, Bhasin SSON Engl J Med. 2010;363(2):109. BACKGROUND: Testosterone supplementation has been shown to increase muscle mass and strength in healthy older men. The safety and efficacy of testosterone treatment in older men who have limitations in mobility have not been studied. METHODS: Community-dwelling men, 65 years of age or older, with limitations in mobility and a total serum testosterone level of 100 to 350 ng per deciliter (3.5 to 12.1 nmol per liter) or a free serum testosterone level of less than 50 pg per milliliter (173 pmol per liter) were randomly assigned to receive placebo gel or testosterone gel, to be applied daily for 6 months. Adverse events were categorized with the use of the Medical Dictionary for Regulatory Activities classification. The data and safety monitoring board recommended that the trial be discontinued early because there was a significantly higher rate of adverse cardiovascular events in the testosterone group than in the placebo group. RESULTS: A total of 209 men (mean age, 74 years) were enrolled at the time the trial was terminated. At baseline, there was a high prevalence of hypertension, diabetes, hyperlipidemia, and obesity among the participants. During the course of the study, the testosterone group had higher rates of cardiac, respiratory, and dermatologic events than did the placebo group. A total of 23 subjects in the testosterone group, as compared with 5 in the placebo group, had cardiovascular-related adverse events. The relative risk of a cardiovascular-related adverse event remained constant throughout the 6-month treatment period. As compared with the placebo group, the testosterone group had significantly greater improvements in leg-press and chest-press strength and in stair climbing while carrying a load. CONCLUSIONS: In this population of older men with limitations in mobility and a high prevalence of chronic disease, the application of a testosterone gel was associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular adverse events. The small size of the trial and the unique population prevent broader inferences from being made about the safety of testosterone therapy. (ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00240981.) ADSection of Endocrinology, Diabetes, and Nutrition, Boston University School of Medicine and Boston Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts 02118, USA.PMID20592293 TI Association of testosterone therapy with mortality, myocardial infarction, and stroke in men with low testosterone levels. AU Vigen R, O'Donnell CI, Barón AE, Grunwald GK, Maddox TM, Bradley SM, Barqawi A, Woning G, Wierman ME, Plomondon ME, Rumsfeld JS, Ho PM SO JAMA. 2013 Nov;310(17):1829-36. IMPORTANCE: Rates of testosterone therapy are increasing and the effects of testosterone therapy on cardiovascular outcomes and mortality are unknown. A recent randomized clinical trial of testosterone therapy in men with a high prevalence of cardiovascular diseases was stopped prematurely due to adverse cardiovascular events raising concerns about testosterone therapy safety. OBJECTIVES: To assess the association between testosterone therapy and all-cause mortality, myocardial infarction (MI), or stroke among male veterans and to determine whether this association is modified by underlying coronary artery disease. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PATIENTS: A retrospective national cohort study of men with low testosterone levels (<300 ng/dL) who underwent coronary angiography in the Veterans Affairs (VA) system between 2005 and 2011. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES: Primary outcome was a composite of all-cause mortality, MI, and ischemic stroke. RESULTS: Of the 8709 men with a total testosterone level lower than 300 ng/dL, 1223 patients started testosterone therapy after a median of 531 days following coronary angiography. Of the 1710 outcome events, 748 men died, 443 had MIs, and 519 had strokes. Of 7486 patients not receiving testosterone therapy, 681 died, 420 had MIs, and 486 had strokes. Among 1223 patients receiving testosterone therapy, 67 died, 23 had MIs, and 33 had strokes. The absolute rate of events were 19.9% in the no testosterone therapy group vs 25.7% in the testosterone therapy group, with an absolute risk difference of 5.8% (95% CI, -1.4% to 13.1%) at 3 years after coronary angiography. In Cox proportional hazards models adjusting for the presence of coronary artery disease, testosterone therapy use as a time-varying covariate was associated with increased risk of adverse outcomes (hazard ratio, 1.29; 95% CI, 1.04 to 1.58). There was no significant difference in the effect size of testosterone therapy among those with and without coronary artery disease (test for interaction, P = .41). CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE: Among a cohort of men in the VA health care system who underwent coronary angiography and had a low serum testosterone level, the use of testosterone therapy was associated with increased risk of adverse outcomes. These findings may inform the discussion about the potential risks of testosterone therapy. AD PMID 24193080 TI Increased risk of non-fatal myocardial infarction following testosterone therapy prescription in men. AU Finkle WD, Greenland S, Ridgeway GK, Adams JL, Frasco MA, Cook MB, Fraumeni JF Jr, Hoover RN SO PLoS One. 2014;9(1):e85805. Epub 2014 Jan 29. BACKGROUND: An association between testosterone therapy (TT) and cardiovascular disease has been reported and TT use is increasing rapidly. METHODS: We conducted a cohort study of the risk of acute non-fatal myocardial infarction (MI) following an initial TT prescription (N = 55,593) in a large health-care database. We compared the incidence rate of MI in the 90 days following the initial prescription (post-prescription interval) with the rate in the one year prior to the initial prescription (pre-prescription interval) (post/pre). We also compared post/pre rates in a cohort of men prescribed phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors (PDE5I; sildenafil or tadalafil, N = 167,279), and compared TT prescription post/pre rates with the PDE5I post/pre rates, adjusting for potential confounders using doubly robust estimation. RESULTS: In all subjects, the post/pre-prescription rate ratio (RR) for TT prescription was 1.36 (1.03, 1.81). In men aged 65 years and older, the RR was 2.19 (1.27, 3.77) for TT prescription and 1.15 (0.83, 1.59) for PDE5I, and the ratio of the rate ratios (RRR) for TT prescription relative to PDE5I was 1.90 (1.04, 3.49). The RR for TT prescription increased with age from 0.95 (0.54, 1.67) for men under age 55 years to 3.43 (1.54, 7.56) for those aged≥75 years (ptrend = 0.03), while no trend was seen for PDE5I (ptrend = 0.18). In men under age 65 years, excess risk was confined to those with a prior history of heart disease, with RRs of 2.90 (1.49, 5.62) for TT prescription and 1.40 (0.91, 2.14) for PDE5I, and a RRR of 2.07 (1.05, 4.11). DISCUSSION: In older men, and in younger men with pre-existing diagnosed heart disease, the risk of MI following initiation of TT prescription is substantially increased. AD Consolidated Research, Inc., Los Angeles, California, United States of America."
  15. don't think he'll be trying that again in a hurry.. Not for a few years any way.. :-) And funny enough I think I have found my answer. Go to bed 8.30ish.. Not ideal but getting more hours sleep in. Bugger waking up at very early on days I manage to get a good sleep though.