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teamfatboy

How Intense is HIIT

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Hi team,

When doing HIIT, how "intense" should it be, to achieve the additional benefits of HIIT over regular cardio ?

Are there any physiological factors influencing whether the upper goal should be "over 75% Max HR" or "Over 80% MHR" or what ?

Or, is it adequate simply to be "in the cardio range' rather than "in the fat-burning range" [to quote off the cardio machines] ??

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If you're assuming a work interval that ranges from 15s to 60s, then you'd want to be working at 9 or 10 on a scale from 1-10, where 10 is all you can handle for that amount of time.

I've never found HR to be very useful in regulating the intensity of intervals, since there's a lag time between actually doing them and when your HR will reflect it.

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I agree with the Pman with the statement about heart rate monitoring whilst training. I have a Polar watch and strap and when I have done HIIT in the past, I'm far too shattered to look at my heart rate or pecentages during the session. It's only afterwards when I have downloaded the information I can compare.

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I have mentioned this before in a seperate thread and have been slated for it, but I would recomend The Tabata Method for HIIT training:

http://www.tabataprotocol.com/.

Depending on your training needs it is very effective. I have seen guys spit off the back of treadmills doing this. I do this with Kettlebell Swings and Push Ups. I can barely breathe afterwards, I feel like I could cough up my lungs.

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I agree with the Pman

Ditto. I thought the point about HIIT was going as hard as you can (without dying) for the time interval.

True... but how do you actually know in an objective (as opposed to perceived) sense what "as hard as you can" is ?

Where in the physiological sense do the benefits of damn-near-chundering in 30s increments actually begin to occur?

What I learned from comparing two logs from HRM was that what I thought was hard-out actually wasn't getting HR over 85%. So, I have to change my RPE perception.

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True... but how do you actually know in an objective (as opposed to perceived) sense what "as hard as you can" is ?

Where in the physiological sense do the benefits of damn-near-chundering in 30s increments actually begin to occur?

What I learned from comparing two logs from HRM was that what I thought was hard-out actually wasn't getting HR over 85%. So, I have to change my RPE perception.

I always presumed for HIIT - When they say "as hard as you can"?

Is like imagine that your ass is on Fire and then run as fast you can to put out. :pfft: :pfft:

Anyway, this is not even an advice because im a noob. But i used to do little bit of HIIT on those electric cardio machines. Which show HR and time and you can adjust the level accordingly.

I got upto level 15, keeping the RPM over 100 for 30sec and 50 RPM for 30sec for 10min. Improved my fitness from level 10 though.

But good luck to wateva you do.

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True... but how do you actually know in an objective (as opposed to perceived) sense what "as hard as you can" is ?

When you can't possibly go any faster or harder, i.e. your physical capacity to do more work is reached, as in sprinting. I guess by my definition, if you can push yourself harder, you're not doing HIIT.

What I learned from comparing two logs from HRM was that what I thought was hard-out actually wasn't getting HR over 85%. So, I have to change my RPE perception.

As Pman said:

I've never found HR to be very useful in regulating the intensity of intervals, since there's a lag time between actually doing them and when your HR will reflect it.
Where in the physiological sense do the benefits of damn-near-chundering in 30s increments actually begin to occur?

That's one for Mr Scientist Pman to answer. All I know is that it's exercise done at high intensity and it's bloody fatiguing when done properly. I did stair HIIT at one point, only once a week, for that reason. And now I don't do it at all.

I don't really think HIIT works on a treadmill because of the delays speeding up and down. Rower would be my pick if I was limited to cardio equipment.

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Where in the physiological sense do the benefits of damn-near-chundering in 30s increments actually begin to occur?

What you're actually after is maximal activation of the anaerobic metabolic pathways. With that in mind, the subtle distinction between near-maximum and true maximum isn't all that important, IMO - "hard enough" with respect to a sufficient duration of work will cover it. What you feel in terms of discomfort is only a reflection of your work output, but it's generally pretty close to the mark.

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Let me put it this way... I used to think that a sprint on my windtrainer at a wheelspeed of 50 kph was the most I could achieve for 10 consecutive 45s sprints with 30s rests - but have recently learned that, presumably because of poor CV fitness or lack of suitably tailored training, that's not getting the HR over 85% which is where popular wisdom has the cutover from aerobic to anaerobic?.

When you can't possibly go any faster or harder, i.e. your physical capacity to do more work is reached, as in sprinting. I guess by my definition, if you can push yourself harder, you're not doing HIIT.

If I understand Pman right, the benefit of HIIT is not linked to such a cutover point, so much linked to "the most you can" - right ?

If for max anaerobic effect, I need to get to 9-10 from 10, that translates to wheelspeeds of over 60 kph for the same 10x 45s/ 30s. And that's gonna be interesting.

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If HIIT is defined as going flat-out for intervals, remind me how it provides extra benefit over steady-state cardio expending the same net calories?

Is it simply savings in time, or does it relate to going deeper into anaerobic activity ?

And am I right in assuming that the aerobic-anaerobic threshold varies by individual and is a function of CV fitness? How does it tie in to VO2 max ?

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If HIIT is defined as going flat-out for intervals, remind me how it provides extra benefit over steady-state cardio expending the same net calories?

Is it simply savings in time, or does it relate to going deeper into anaerobic activity ?

And am I right in assuming that the aerobic-anaerobic threshold varies by individual and is a function of CV fitness? How does it tie in to VO2 max ?

in basic terms ive always been led to believe that by doing interval training you will keep yourself in fat burning mode longer after you have finished your exercize.

where with normal steady exersize your body returns to normal levels sooner so the effects of hiit training are definitely short term.

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