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Rick123

Do you even protein?

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I thought this video was interesting.
According to the research, vegans have higher blood protein levels.
 

According to this study, vegans have higher testosterone.
 

Lowered IGF-1 from a reduction in animal products doesn't seem to hinder muscle mass.
If exercise and eating healthier naturally lowers IGF-1, logically it doesn't make sense it would. Why would improving your health lower the rate of muscle growth?

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Haven't watched the videos but will later. 

 

I agree on the fact that animal biased proteins aren't required but a lot of meat heads (no pun intended) will disagree. 

 

 

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3 hours ago, PETN said:

Are you by any chance a vegan Rick?

Yes. Initially, I resisted the idea of going vegan as I was certain it would impact my physical performance. Now I'm confident that is not the case and with an appropriately planned diet I feel I had an advantage.

Whatever the case, honestly I couldn't really care less about being exact. As I got older, I've learnt social approval is just completely horseshit. The size of my muscles doesn't phase me like it used to. 

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6 hours ago, Rick123 said:

Yes. Initially, I resisted the idea of going vegan as I was certain it would impact my physical performance. Now I'm confident that is not the case and with an appropriately planned diet I feel I had an advantage.

Whatever the case, honestly I couldn't really care less about being exact. As I got older, I've learnt social approval is just completely horseshit. The size of my muscles doesn't phase me like it used to. 

That's not relatable for most of us. ?

 

There are countless other reasons to go vegan too, potentially more important too, like the environment ,numerous other health benefits, and sustainability in general. But I personally think an entirely restricted diet is impractical for most of us, especially bodybuilders, as well as unnecessary. 

 

We would benefit more from just minimising the non plant based foods, with the purpose of signalling less demand (this helps with decreasing production and therefore improving environmental and sustainability concerns, however minimally). This strategy is also more sustainable in our day to day lives, because let's be honest, the shift to a completely plant based diet isn't easy and people will just fall off the bandwagon and give up entirely. 

 

So yeah, I'd say a 90% vegan diet would be much better suited, and off memory the author the China Study himself said it would indeed still reap many of the benefits. 

 

This is a pretty unwelcome subject in NZ though because we're up shit creek without a paddle if our animal product production became unnecessary tomorrow. ? 

 

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The reasons I became a vegan was for my health, the environment and a philosophical stance on mortality, not due to whole plant based bodybuilding. The aim of this thread  was to merely suggest that animal protein is not critical and that there may be some bodybuilding benefits with replacing animal protein with plant sources.

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3 hours ago, Rick123 said:

The reasons I became a vegan was for my health, the environment and a philosophical stance on mortality not due to whole plant based bodybuilding. The aim of this thread  was to merely suggest that animal protein is not critical and that there may be some bodybuilding benefits with replacing animal protein with plant sources.

I figured as much, but what you should know is that conveying these benefits can't be rather pointless unless you do it effectively and completely (big picture shit). Although the benefits to bodybuilding is a pretty good hook. ?

 

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Simply choosing alternative animal protein sources can reduce your footprint in terms of environmental damage significantly.

 

For example choosing to eat chicken over beef. Chicken as a fifth the emissions of methane, a fifth the amount of water consumption and a fifth the amount of biomass consumed per kilogram of protein. 

 

So choosing to not eat red meat and only chicken would reduce your environmental impact by 80% effectively.

 

I am a big driver in sustainability both in terms of food and energy and trying to drive it as an design engineer in the dairy industry which I don't completely encourage.  

 

Water consumption, biomass, energy use and emissions are real concerns. 

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17 minutes ago, jimmybro1 said:

Simply choosing alternative animal protein sources can reduce your footprint in terms of environmental damage significantly.

 

For example choosing to eat chicken over beef. Chicken as a fifth the emissions of methane, a fifth the amount of water consumption and a fifth the amount of biomass consumed per kilogram of protein. 

 

So choosing to not eat red meat and only chicken would reduce your environmental impact by 80% effectively.

 

I am a big driver in sustainability both in terms of food and energy and trying to drive it as an design engineer in the dairy industry which I don't completely encourage.  

 

Water consumption, biomass, energy use and emissions are real concerns. 

 

I agree that these things are big problems but the food we eat only makes up part of our "environmental footprint" so changing to chicken will make less of a relative difference than you are suggesting.

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1 hour ago, PETN said:

 

I agree that these things are big problems but the food we eat only makes up part of our "environmental footprint" so changing to chicken will make less of a relative difference than you are suggesting.

Your are right. Was relating to food consumption related footprint as opposed to lifestyle footprint 

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On 01/03/2017 at 11:07 AM, jimmybro1 said:

Your are right. Was relating to food consumption related footprint as opposed to lifestyle footprint 

Any idea how much of a part food consumption plays, relative to the overall lifestyle? It'd be interesting to know how much difference diet makes, compared to the average Auckland commute!

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People would eat anywhere from 3-7 times a day.  Only 2 trips to work and home. That's potentially 5 more times to tell people about what you are doing, to feel important and aloof.

 

Hey guys how do you think all the fruit, vegetables etc get into the supermarkets... big twin turbo eight cylinder diesel trucks that have have 40ft refrigerated trailers that run straight for 18+ hours a day.

 

More you eat, more fuel emissions since the whole animal thing is looked at from that pov. It's all about people individually making a combined change, isn't it?

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1 hour ago, Realtalk said:

People would eat anywhere from 3-7 times a day.  Only 2 trips to work and home. That's potentially 5 more times to tell people about what you are doing, to feel important and aloof.

 

Hey guys how do you think all the fruit, vegetables etc get into the supermarkets... big twin turbo eight cylinder diesel trucks that have have 40ft refrigerated trailers that run straight for 18+ hours a day.

 

More you eat, more fuel emissions since the whole animal thing is looked at from that pov. It's all about people individually making a combined change, isn't it?

This is true, but animal meats are also transported and stored at low temperatures. 

 

The big difference is are the methane emissions and water consumption from the food source itself. Growing fruit is offsets carbon emissions through the process of converting carbon dioxide to oxygen. Also the animal products result in a lot of water way contamination from run off etc. Insects are likely to be the most sustainable source of protein. 

Picture2.jpg.50876a5a1740be5b686b7f4009ab4529.jpg

Picture3.jpg.0eb9f591ad69162cfb61be196559d432.jpg

 

Yes these sources of food are all transported but they are transported from a central location which allows the opportunity for renewable energy sources to be used to power there transportation. A lot for this work is already being done in Europe with the  use of electric cars (i.e. Tesla http://www.carohcar.com/the-new-tesla-electric-cars-are-set-to-get-launched/) and houses generation all there power completely independent to the grid by using newly developed solar tiles on there roofs.

clark-howard_894187581.jpg

 

The-New-Tesla-Electric-Cars-are-set-to-g

Other potential fuel sources being bio-fuels such as ethanol, hydrogen and bio-diesel. Two of which have carbon emissions but the other emission is only water. These bio-fuels are carbon neutral as there generation offset the carbon balance.

Picture1.jpg.741bb2b02ac0f4bdf7bad4640a53d39d.jpg

 

There are plenty of opportunities to have a more sustainable lifestyle and its individuals that have to make the changes as they are the ones that drive the decisions of the industrial industry.

 

Countries like China are adapting and addressing these issues with complete transparency of industries emissions which are readily available to the public, they also have the largest wind farms in the world.

 

Here is a link to the ten largest renewable energy power plant projects in the world 

http://www.energydigital.com/top10/2726/Largest-Renewable-Energy-Projects-in-the-World

 

For every liter of milk processed in UHT plants a liter of water is wasted... industries like this New Zealand relies on so it is OK to turn a blind eye too it? Not much is being don't to improve this either... why because there is no financial incentive. 

 

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7 hours ago, Kalidane said:

So I can eat a cow or 100 crickets?  Is this a trick question?

80% of the worlds nations eat crickets... they taste fine. 

 

In a couple decades we will have no choice... 

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30 minutes ago, jimmybro1 said:

80% of the worlds nations eat crickets... they taste fine. 

 

In a couple decades we will have no choice... 

 

What percentage of the total population or the population of those '80% of nations' actually eat crickets though?

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21 minutes ago, PETN said:

 

What percentage of the total population or the population of those '80% of nations' actually eat crickets though?

Not enough ha

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