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Daz69

SHOULD OFF SEASON TRAINING DIFFER

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An interesting post from a friend, I thought I'd share:
Q: Does your offseason training differ from your training style when trying to get in shape?
NO. Training should NOT change. Your goal is to maintain the same loads and stressors that originally built the body. This in itself helps maintain as much lean muscle tissue even under strenuous dieting conditions. You want to keep the exact same exercises and maintain as much strength on those exercises as possible. Keep on using the combination of the Four-Horseman (test-deca-dbol-adrol) that is easiest and healthiest on the body that concurrently maintains fluids and intramuscular hydration. Use the harsh cutting compounds sparingly if possible and or when you need to absolutely look your best.


Take a look at many of the old-school bodybuilders with training still at peak intensity while using free weights weeks to days away from the big dance. There are times where you will see some go to machines a few weeks out mainly because of the fear of getting hurt and the joints hurting due to the cutting agents.  Changing loads and exercises and even rep ranges to bring up or to carve out a body part is nonsense under a calorie reduced environment. Lets critically think about this for a minute. Your average gym patron does abs every day with the expectation that fat "melts' off regionally around the midsection. Look around your gym, you see them every day!!! Thinking logically, does that work? So why would higher reps work in the same way?  Or does changing exercises under a controlled lower calorie intake now create new muscle or bring out details?   NOOOOOOOOO.....

I have a new training partner that I have known for years. He is a competitive bodybuilder getting ready for his next show and asked me to help him bring up his lagging body parts. Now how do I describe him? I'll start with his cruising weight. As of now he weighs in around 340lbs. Yes that's not a typo, I stated three hundred and forty pounds. The man is MASSIVE!! His he naturally a big BIG, TALL intimidating fella, and looks like a muscular linebacker. He is also a trainer in the area as that is how I met him, as he has a few clients he trains at my gym. What is most interesting about him is the stories from his real day job. He is a personal bodyguard for billionaires, not millionaires. And Ill save some of his stories for another day. 

So what is the point of my story regarding my new training partner. Well, as I explained to him, he came to me for help at a time where I can teach him better training fundamentals, which will make a HUGE difference, but because of where he is at, cruising for another month or so, followed by dieting, he will not see any progress because calories the most important variable in the equation will not be met to add new muscle structure. The first day he did back with me he was sore for over a week. And he had to use half the weight he normally used to get his form down. But even under these conditions he will not advance!!! You must understand this premise, and it not about which AAS is best or even the exercises, when it comes to growth, it comes down to having all the variables in place. The correct beginning body fat amounts, training, the abundance of calories/nutrients and the correct AAS and ratios for your development. If one is missing you will not grow to any appreciable amount. So in other words what he is learning and mastering now, will come to fruition on his next bulking/growing phase after his show when he is at his leanest. The growth stage after is when his lagging body parts will really respond, not NOW.

So getting back to the question, even with revamping his training techniques going into his show will NOT make a significant difference, because basically he's got what he built going into prep. We cant change that, only the amounts of fat and water in and around his physique can be manipulated at this point.  Notice I said AROUND, not focused, because the body releases fat and water throughout the body, not from a specific "targeted" region.

There are exceptions to the rule of course. We are not all made the same, and genetics again being the most important component to growth. We all have certain (one or two) body parts that come on easy to develop and they will continue to develop to some degree even under restricted environments. It is the lagging muscles that will need optimal environments and TIME in the growth protocols for maximum development. GH and insulin again also change the ratio of fat to muscle gain under restricted or calorie surplus intake. The more GH that is used especially for the genetic elite the more they get to eat and grow while limiting fat gain. GH is a game changer in this regard. I do not look at it strictly as a muscle builder per say, but more of a hormone that regulates fat deposition and mobilization. There is one VERY IMPORTANT key example of GH's true muscle growth potential WHEN USED IN ISOLATION.  One cannot ignore the poor muscular development on active aids patients using and prescribed 18iu plus per day. Even with a positive calorie intake and an exercise induced environment they are far from even looking athletic or even resemble bodybuilders. 

So even if you took my arm routine, and started while dieting/cruising, you will not see the results until you have mastered the form and implemented it during a growth phase where all the key variables are in place.  That is why this is truly a marathon not sprint, it occurs in stages. And you must prepare in advance for those stages. Expecting results right here and right now just because you changes esters, or removed one AAS for another is limiting. Bouncing around looking for that short term "magical" formula will do little as it is your long term approach that will make the true difference. This is especially true if you're pushing the envelope on toxic cutting, designer /exotic compounds at the wrong time looking for that quick fix.

Think long term folks....

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Good post Daz,

 

Whilst I cant provide an eductated comment on how gear affects all this side of things, I have always understood that the pre comp time was always about dropping fat whilst maintaining as much of what you have built in the non comp dieting phase.

Still aiming to be using the same rep ranges and as much of the same intensity (weight on the bar) as possible.

 

I agree, the time to bring up weak areas is best done in a calorie surplus and lower stressed state and not during pre comp dieting.

 

Sound logic missed by so many.

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Daz I'm going to speculate here on top of your post. If I'm struggling to maintain my offseason weights - reps - sets during a diet / prep would you say there is an issue with my diet? 

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26 minutes ago, Terrymundo said:

Daz I'm going to speculate here on top of your post. If I'm struggling to maintain my offseason weights - reps - sets during a diet / prep would you say there is an issue with my diet? 

Yes unless you are extremely low body fat

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Yes, IMO train with lower frequency but longer sessions during off season, 1x per week per bodypart should be sufficient. 2 bodyparts per session and focus most on heavy compounds and making gains in strength to build up the best base possible.

 

Pre comp train with as much frequency as possible. And use the mirror as a guide to focus on and hone in all your weak spots as you diet down.

 

I haven't competed so judge my advice as that of an observer. I train very hard though. :)

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3 hours ago, I Declare War said:

Yes, IMO train with lower frequency but longer sessions during off season, 1x per week per bodypart should be sufficient. 2 bodyparts per session and focus most on heavy compounds and making gains in strength to build up the best base possible.

 

Pre comp train with as much frequency as possible. And use the mirror as a guide to focus on and hone in all your weak spots as you diet down.

 

I haven't competed so judge my advice as that of an observer. I train very hard though. :)

 
 
Why train one way to build our muscle and then change everything once you start losing fat? Isn't the goal to put on muscle gear around and then at a certain point maintain what you have...? Yeah maybe a little bit more isolation towards the end but I wouldn't go changing the whole program.

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1 hour ago, trainlikeafreak said:
 
Why train one way to build our muscle and then change everything once you start losing fat? Isn't the goal to put on muscle gear around and then at a certain point maintain what you have...? Yeah maybe a little bit more isolation towards the end but I wouldn't go changing the whole program.

 

For a number of reasons:

 

One is because I would not do cardio pre comp if not necessary, instead I would double up the training sessions and really concentrate on honing everything in.

 

Second is because during pre comp is when your AAS dosages will also be highest, so it is to make use of all of the potential for growth possible. 12-16 weeks out of a comptition you steadily ramp everything up and blast into it.

 

During off season, dosages should be lower, and with less gear comes less training sessions. You must limit the fatigue and train in a way to build a base up. During the off season strive for balance in your life and not being in the gym 6 or 7 days a week.

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Off season you eat more and have extra bw and cushioning on joints so you don't need as much gear (although most guys take lots all year around).. then dieting the idea is to maintain whatever muscle you managed to grow off season while you diet and are in a calorie deficit. The actual nature of your workouts shouldn't differ that much it's just the mindset that changes. If you get stronger during a prep then you probably weren't training that hard off season ;) 

 

Off season and on calorie surplus is when you want to be improving weak body parts then pre comp is just getting rid of bf. If you're too worried about losing muscle (even though you're probably gassed out of your mind pre comp) then you're going to be at odds mentally with what you're trying to achieve. Guys who say you shouldn't do cardio cos it'll shrink your legs should probably have done some decent leg work offseason and then done their best to maintain their strength as they dieted down. Maybe they just think they have more muscle than they actually do? That's my opinion anyway..

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is their any truth in the muscle relocation principle.where a muscle group will improve faster if another is sacraficed.ie...if your tri's are proportionately to large compared to your bi's by dropping your intensity in your tri training and increasing bi's intensity your bi's will improve quicker than if you maintained high intensity in both.?

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Well if you prioritise a body part over others then yes you can improve it. Hence specialisation routines. What I would say is that you're not sacrificing one to improve the other. You're just doing maintenance on one while you focus on the other. Sometimes just structuring your workout will automatically make this happen. For example if you're biceps are weak in relation to your triceps, doing your biceps first when training arms will automatically mean you work them harder just because you're fresh. 

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On 10/15/2016 at 3:57 PM, HarryB said:

Well if you prioritise a body part over others then yes you can improve it. Hence specialisation routines. What I would say is that you're not sacrificing one to improve the other. You're just doing maintenance on one while you focus on the other. Sometimes just structuring your workout will automatically make this happen. For example if you're biceps are weak in relation to your triceps, doing your biceps first when training arms will automatically mean you work them harder just because you're fresh. 

That's too simple.

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