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How to eat eggs

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Right now my diet has a lot of eggs in it. I'm a big believer in making food interesting, so rather than eat the same thing day after day, I'm going to try some different ways of cooking and eating eggs. I'll post each recipe here.

At its base, each recipe will include 500ml egg white and 3 whole eggs - just because that's what's in my diet at the moment. For most of these recipes, you should be able to change the quantities to suit your own diet without too much hassle - although of course you'll need to adjust the other ingredients as well. If you're on low carbs, you can generally substitute Splenda for sugar. If you're on high carbs, I dunno... have a piece of toast or something.

 

Sweet scrambled eggs with orange and chocolate

500ml egg whites
3 whole eggs
1/4 cup sugar or Splenda
1/2 tsp vanilla essence
2-3 Tbsp water
1 orange
1 row (4 squares) of a chocolate block - I use the 62% cocoa dark chocolate

Blend or whisk the eggs and whites, sugar, vanilla and water. Take the zest from the orange and add to egg mixture, putting the orange to one side. Pour into a large frying pan or saucepan on medium-low heat. Stir regularly, particularly once the eggs start to thicken. While the eggs are cooking, peel the orange, and cut into cubes or segments. Cut the chocolate block into chunks. When the eggs are cooked, tip into a bowl, and arrange orange and chocolate on top.

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Sorry, I've been busy with other Gymnation work, so the updates have fallen behind a bit.

I do have a few more goodies to come, but figured I'd better not forget the basics first...

 

Scrambled eggs on toast with tomato, bacon.

500ml egg whites
3 whole eggs
Splash of water or milk
Salt & pepper
1 onion
3 pieces of toast
2 rashers of bacon
1 tomato
Chopped parsley to garnish

Blend the liquid stuff, adding a bit of salt and pepper to taste.

Dice the onion. Heat a frying pan with just enough oil to prevent sticking, and cook the onion and bacon on a medium heat until the onion is soft. Add the eggs and, stirring regularly, cook until just thick. Remove from heat immedately and put on toast.

Turn up the heat and cook the bacon until brown both sides. Arrange bacon on top of eggs. Cut the tomato in half, and push it around the pan. This a) cooks the tomato in the yummy bacon juices, and b) cleans the pan. Functional AND tasty.

Arrange on plate. Take photo. Post to social media.

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Plum clafoutis

A clafoutis (pronounced kla-foo-tee) is a sort of baked custard tart thing. Conveniently, it uses a lot of eggs.

3 eggs
500ml egg whites
200ml milk or water
1/2 tsp vanilla essence
3/4 cup sugar or Splenda
2 Tbsp flour
2 plums (can also use berries instead)

Preheat oven to 180°C. Blend all ingredients except for the plums, and pour into a tin lined with baking paper. Remove the stones from the plums and slice into segments. Arrange the slices on top of the egg mixture (they'll float below the surface a bit - that's ok). Cook for about 30 mins, or until softly set and golden-brown on top.

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f*ck those all look real good man, I still love doing the protein pudding

 

1 Scoop of protein powder
1 Whole egg
A ¼ cup of water

Mix it in a bowl so it's like cake batter...
Microwave it anywhere from 40secs  to a minute 20... This depends on if you want wet, or really dry consistency

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Yeah, that clafoutis is particularly awesome, if I say so myself. I was just annoyed that the plum slices all floated out of the aesthetically pleasing arrangement I'd put them in. Bastards! The lesson here: don't even try, and just call it "rustic".

I'll have to try the protein pudding... I've got some protein powder I'm not loving at the moment, so this could be a good way to use it up.

Next recipe attempt will be a special Easter version. Will let you know how it goes!

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Easter eggs

Produces 10 cakes
Feeds 1 person

This recipe takes the flavours of hot cross buns, and turns them into a high-protein baked egg custard. Pure awesome.

3 eggs
500ml egg whites
200ml water
1/2 tsp vanilla essence
1/2 cup sugar or Splenda (I used white sugar, but brown sugar might be even nicer)
2 Tbsp plain flour
1 Tbsp cinnamon
1 Tbsp mixed spice
1/2 tsp nutmeg
1/2 cup sultanas/raisins/currants
1 Tbsp glace mixed peel

2-3 Tbsp egg white for the crosses (optional)

Preheat oven to 180°C. Blend all ingredients except the dried fruit and mixed peel. Pour into well-greased silicon muffin trays. You need to leave a few millimetres for it to expand, so don't fill each cup right to the top. Bake for 10 minutes.

Meanwhile, combine the dried fruit and mixed peel in a bowl, breaking up any bits that are stuck together. Remove egg mixture from oven and sprinkle a bit of the fruit mix into each cup. By adding it now, you've allowed a bit of a crust to form, so the fruit won't fall directly to the bottom. Put eggs back in the oven, and continue cooking for another 10-15 minutes. They should end up soft and wobbly, but set.

Let your egg cakes cool, then gently pull the sides of the tray away, and push up from the bottom to pop them out.

 

I was tempted not to bother with crosses. Then I asked myself, what would Jesus do? The answer was obvious - he'd use egg whites, for even more protein. So that's what I did too.

Grease a non-stick frying pan. Pour a few tablespoons of egg white into a thin layer, and cook on a medium heat. Take off the heat before it starts to bubble - you want a nice smooth cross, not a bubble one. Let it cool slightly, and gently remove from pan. Cut into strips with a sharp knife, and arrange in crosses on your egg cake.

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Great source of good quality protein with easily defined levels of protein and fats.

Nuitritionally well balanced levels of all amino acids and good source of minerals and vitamins if u use some of the yolks

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Great source of good quality protein with easily defined levels of protein and fats.

Nuitritionally well balanced levels of all amino acids and good source of minerals and vitamins if u use some of the yolks

 

Yup.  The yolks are where the awesome is.  It's what baby birds are made of so you know it's good.

 

I don't have links to science handy, but it seems that free-range eggs have a way better nutrient profile, especially better fats composition.  Possibly very important health implications.  They seem to cost about twice as much as the prison-raised eggs but they have near double the vitamins and minerals so that works out.  If on restrictive calories it's even more appealing (nutrient density).

 

The IDGAF recipe:

Mix and cook a can of baked beans and a can of chili beans.

Apply heat to 5-6 eggs.

Put beans in a bowl (you may need to buy a bigger bowl).

Put eggs on beans.

Eat.

 

Optional: Add marjoram.

 

Assuming 5 prison-eggs we get:

Calories: 1,209

Carbs:129g

Fats: 33g

Protein: 75g

Less farts than 4 double cheeseburgers.  Harden up.

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Awesome! But you really need to add salt and pepper (at the very least) before scrambled eggs become interesting. I wonder if you could somehow inject seasoning into the egg before scrambling like this?

why do you eat so many eggs in your diet? is it cheaper sourse of protien then beef/chicken?

They're quick, easy and cheap.

3 eggs + 500ml egg whites = 80g protein, 15g fat, 0g carbs... for about $4.50.

 

easily defined levels of protein and fats

Very much this! So often, working out the level of fat in food is just a guesstimate. (Just how lean is that rump steak? How fatty is your salmon?) It's all very annoying for an OCD bodybuilder. With an egg, you know exactly what you're getting.

 

The yolks are where the awesome is.  It's what baby birds are made of so you know it's good.

Chickens don't come fresher than this!

 

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Ngapuhi Strong - another point in favour of the egg is its versatility. There's only so many way of dressing up a steak, but with eggs the possibilities are endless.

 

Here's one I whipped up last night to get rid of a few old hot cross buns I had lying around. This one's a bit vague because I wasn't planning on turning it into a recipe - it was just a way of using up leftovers. But it tasted so good, I thought I should share.

Hot cross bun bread and butter pudding

3 eggs
500ml egg whites
200ml milk (I used water, and a shitload of milk powder so it was probably creamier than normal milk)
About 1/4 cup Splenda or sugar
A pinch of cinnamon/mixed spice/nutmeg (just because my hot cross buns were cheap and bland)
3 hot cross buns
1 over-ripe banana that needed using up

Preheat oven to 180°C. Blend eggs, milk, sugar and spices together. Cut hot cross buns into thin slices (I cut them vertically so I didn't end up with some slices that were just crust).

Line a cake tin with baking paper, and layer with hot cross buns and slices of banana. Pour over egg mixture, and squidge the buns into the mix with the back of a spoon.

Cook until golden on top - I think it was about 15 mins?

Serve with sliced pear and chocolate icecream (optional, but highly recommended).

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eggs are the kind of food id only eat if i was trying to 'cut' or n some faggy IIFYM leangains diet. too much volume per amount of nutrients. fucking hate throwing away the yolks as well

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Frittata

Frittata is one of those recipes you can make to use up leftovers. You can throw virtually anything in and it's good. Here's what went into mine...

1 onion
2 rashers bacon (rind removed)
1/2 cup of broccoli florets, cut into halves or quarters
100g couscous
1 carrot, grated
3 eggs
500ml egg whites
A decent shake of Cajun seasoning
Salt & pepper


Dice the onion and bacon. Put a little oil in a large frying pan and fry with the broccoli until the onion is translucent, and the bacon and broccoli are cooked (you may need to cover with a lid so the steam helps the broccoli cook).

Stick the couscous in a bowl, and cover with roughly twice the amount of boiling water. Let it stand until all the water has been absorbed. I pre-made the couscous using this method, but it occurs to me now that actually you could probably just add couscous and water straight into the egg mix prior to cooking.

Blend the eggs and seasoning. Pour into frying pan over the onion, bacon and broccoli. Add the couscous and grated carrot. Give everything a good stir, then cover and leave it to cook on a low heat.

Cooking can take a while, depending on how high your frittata is (which is why a low heat is important so it doesn't burn on the bottom). It's the top that will always be the problem area, so if necessary, take off the stove and finish cooking under a grill.

If it all turns to shit, and it's just not cooking, stir it up and pretend it's scrambled eggs. That's a frittata Fail, but it will still be tasty.

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Nice Receipes Pseudonym,

Ive got my own to add, which i stole like the shameless bastard i am from Brandom Cambell's youtube channel.

 

Egg and Bacon Burrito's

 

Ingredients,

 

3 Large Whole Eggs

Spinach

2 Wraps (I use nature’s fresh original high fibre)

Bacon (use whatever you want, could use ham etc.)

BBQ Sauce

Splash of milk

 

It’s pretty easy, fry up the bacon, then set it aside.

 

Crack the eggs into a small pan, add a splash of milk and scramble them. (Pro Tip: Don’t overcook them for f*ck sake).  Just before they finish cooking add the spinach and stir it in. Could even chop that shit before adding if you like.

 

Warm up wraps so they don’t split when rolled, 20-30seconds works pretty well in the microwave. Then put half the egg in each wrap, slice the bacon if you can be bothered. Add BBQ sauce or whatever type of condiments you’re into. Then wrap that shit and then stuff it in your face like you’re going to miss you’re 15minute anabolic window.

 

I haven’t done the macros but will be dependent on what you put in it. Could use egg whites and less whole eggs. Don’t have spinach, don’t worry or don’t wana use bacon, well it still works.

 

I think salsa instead of bbq sauce would be fucking legit, but haven’t tried it.

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Nice! Salsa and eggs is definitely a legit combo. They were meant for each other.

Here's another one...

 

Sweet scrambled eggs with muscovado sugar and almonds

Muscovado sugar is like brown sugar on steroids. It's darker and has a much stronger flavour - almost like molasses or licorice. If that's too much awesome for you to handle, you can also use a muscovado-style sugar (just a little bit lighter) or plain brown sugar (much lighter, you pussy).

500ml egg whites
3 whole eggs
1/4 cup sugar or Splenda
1/2 tsp vanilla essence
2-3 Tbsp water
1-2 Tbsp muscovado sugar
Handful of almonds, chopped or slivered

Blend the eggs, sugar, vanilla, water and cook as per usual to make scrambled eggs. Sprinkle with muscovado sugar and almonds. Job done - too easy!

 

 

BTW - I showed some of these recipes to a girl at work. She looked positively ill at the thought of sweet scrambled eggs. Don't be put off by the unknown. In fact, the only difference between sweet scrambled eggs and a proper egg custard is the amount of liquid you add. The recipe is awesome. Try it.

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Right, I need some help with this next one. I'm working on a recipe now which, if I can perfect it, will be particularly awesome.

I won't reveal the exact details yet, but it involves a lemon custard. And that's where the trouble starts. I used the same custard recipe that worked so well for my Easter eggs, and added lemon juice.

Unfortunately it then seems to curdle when cooked.

I've tried cooking it in a cooler oven, and in a water bath, because I thought maybe the high temperatures could be making it separate. Then I tried adding cream (which rather defeated the purpose of low-fat egg whites), but that didn't work either.

The only consolation is that the duds still taste pretty good, and I just have to keep making and eating them till I get it right. But now I'm kind of stumped. Any suggestions?

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its because the lemon juice is acidic. causes casein to clump or some shit. go do a food science paper or buy this book, i have it and i would reccomend it

 

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That's what I figured. Although it would be albumin not casein, because I hadn't added any milk (except for one attempt, but that failed too).

But doesn't fat act as an emulsifier to keep it from separating? Hence the butter in lemon curd, or the cream in a lemon tart.

Hmm. More research is required, I think!

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This is actually quite interesting...

Emulsions: Your Mother Was a Chemist

Some emulsions, like hollandaise sauce, call for cooking an egg stabilized emulsion.  The proteins in an egg are easy to denature with heat.  That is what you see happening when an egg white turns from transparent to actually being white.

The egg proteins start out carefully folded up, so that they can do the job they do in the cell.  We heat them to get them to open up, so they tangle together and prevent the flow of water in the mixture, and so the oil loving parts can find the oil.  If we heat them too much, then they will start bonding together into a strong rubbery network, and we get scrambled eggs instead of a thick sauce.

Eggs begin to coagulate at 160° to 170° Fahrenheit (70° to 77° Celsius).  Not coincidentally, this is also the temperature needed to coagulate the proteins in salmonella and other pathogens, thus killing them.  In order to cook the eggs well enough to kill bacteria, while still preventing them from scrambling, we use a well-known trick from both chemistry and your mother's cookbooks.  We add an acid to the eggs.

Acids prevent some of the chemical bonds from forming between the proteins until the temperature gets much higher, closer to 195° Fahrenheit (90° Celsius).  So adding some lemon juice or vinegar to the sauce will prevent the eggs from curdling, at least if you keep the temperature well below boiling.

But I've also found pages that say the exact opposite.

I'm going to try a version cooked in little muffin tins (as I did with the Easter eggs) - I suspect that cooking in a big bowl means that even in a waterbath, the outside overcooks before the inside sets.

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